How Maude’s Awards Came To Be

Maude’s Awards celebrates and inspires innovative practices that enrich the quality of life for persons living with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias and that of their care partners. Eight monetary awards will be made each year—three $25,000 awards to organizations and five $5,000 awards to individuals. The deadline to apply for this year’s Maude’s Awards is May 31, 2020. Learn more here. Maude and Richard … Continue reading How Maude’s Awards Came To Be

What is palliative care? Q&A with Dr. Lee Burnside

Lee Burnside, MD, MBA, is a geriatrician and palliative care physician in the Division of Geriatrics at the University of Washington. He works in palliative and hospice care and is a member of the UW Memory Brain and Wellness Center. He has had a longtime interest in caring for and improving the lives of persons with dementia and their family, friends and community. He has … Continue reading What is palliative care? Q&A with Dr. Lee Burnside

2020 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures

The 2020 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report was released March 11 and contains the most up-to-date data on Alzheimer’s prevalence and mortality, caregiving and the costs of health care for people living with the disease. Below are key takeaways from the report, including data for Washington State and Idaho. This year’s special report, “On the Front Lines: Primary Care Physicians and Alzheimer’s Care in … Continue reading 2020 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures

Home care, home health and assisted living: What’s the difference?

*Editor’s note, the 2020 Discovery Alzheimer’s Regional Conference has been rescheduled to June 25, 2020. Please see note below article.  By: CarePartners  The Value of Home Care Report, published by the Home Care Association of America, states that nine out of 10 Americans aged 65 and older want to stay in their own homes; however, 40% need daily assistance and over 70% will need assistance … Continue reading Home care, home health and assisted living: What’s the difference?

The Promise

By Mel Watson, Director, Time Together Adult Day Services, Island Senior Resources How many of us ever plan to be a family caregiver? Do we consider what we might do, if someone close to us needs help to do everyday things? It’s not something most of us think about until we are facing it, head on. Years ago, my mom made me promise never to … Continue reading The Promise

Finding Joy: 10 Tips for Caregivers

There is no doubt that being a family caregiver is not easy. It often comes with long days, new challenges and changing family dynamics. Even so, there may be an opportunity for you and your loved one to find moments of joy in your day-to-day routine. Our Care Consultants have compiled 10 tips to find joy as a family caregiver, in hopes that you will … Continue reading Finding Joy: 10 Tips for Caregivers

The grief and loss of reciprocity

by Reed Henry, MA, LMHC, gerontologist  I met with a man this morning that had recently experienced the agony of placing his dear sweet wife in a specialized memory care facility. Walter and Emma* have been married 62 wonderful years and he loves her with all of his heart. My last two encounters with him have centered on his unhappiness with the care she has … Continue reading The grief and loss of reciprocity

Dementia Whisperer: Denial, A Survival Mechanism

By Kathy Stewart, RN, BSN, Aegis Living VP of Nursing and Care Sponsored by Aegis Living In denial, we find our comfortable place—where nothing is changing, and the alarm bells are silent. But denial is only a coping mechanism to avoid an uncomfortable or stressful situation. Denial is why a parent believes they can live on their own when they are clearly endangering themselves. Denial … Continue reading Dementia Whisperer: Denial, A Survival Mechanism

Contemplative Caregiving: A Q&A with Jonathan Prescott

Jonathan Prescott is the founder of Wise Caregiving, a nonprofit dedicated to helping people become effective, sustainable and empathetic caregivers. Jonathan’s career as a hospice, cancer-care and hospital Chaplain, along with his spiritual practice as an ordained student of Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, gives him a unique perspective on how to thrive within the helping professions. His trainings help people learn the arts of listening, … Continue reading Contemplative Caregiving: A Q&A with Jonathan Prescott

A family portrait

How siblings can avoid fighting over caregiving disagreements

By Janet L. Smith As your parents get older, it may become increasingly important for you and your siblings to come together and help your parents find the best caregiving options. Depending on the circumstances and the health of your parents, you may be able to hire in-home caregivers that allow your parents to stay in their own home. In other situations, an assisted living … Continue reading How siblings can avoid fighting over caregiving disagreements