Home care, home health and assisted living: What’s the difference?

By: CarePartners  The Value of Home Care Report, published by the Home Care Association of America, states that nine out of 10 Americans aged 65 and older want to stay in their own homes; however, 40% need daily assistance and over 70% will need assistance at some point in their lives. A family may be faced with a few considerations to provide assistance for loved … Continue reading Home care, home health and assisted living: What’s the difference?

Year in Review: Impact Report FY19

The Alzheimer’s Association Washington State Chapter is pleased to present to you — our loyal supporters — the Impact Report for Fiscal Year 2019. We are grateful for the many ways your support enhances the lives of people in our community affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Below are key highlights of all we accomplished together in the past year. Thank you again for … Continue reading Year in Review: Impact Report FY19

My Advocacy Story: Dee Anne De Angelo

Above: Dee Anne and her mother, Rose Dee Anne De Angelo is an Air Force veteran raising two teenagers in Wenatchee, WA. In addition to raising her kids, Dee Anne is the founder of a group that supports women veterans, and was the sole caregiver for her mother with Alzheimer’s disease who recently passed away. This is her Alzheimer’s advocacy story.  Dee Anne’s father was … Continue reading My Advocacy Story: Dee Anne De Angelo

Tipping the scales: nutrition for brain health

By Marilyn Walls, M.S. Marilyn has a Masters of Science in Nutrition from Bastyr University, where she also taught as an adjunct professor. She has written articles for local publications, a book on family and Alzheimer’s from a nutritionist’s perspective, and has taught hundreds of classes throughout the U.S. on nutrition, supplements, essential oils, sustainable eating and natural skin care. My mother, born on a … Continue reading Tipping the scales: nutrition for brain health

Amy and her mom touch noses

Caregivers: What are you thankful for?

In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, we asked local caregivers to tell us what they are thankful for. Caregiving comes with many challenges, but there are also many bright spots along with way. We are inspired by the resilience and positivity of the caregivers we serve. Thank you for sharing your stories with us! Continue reading Caregivers: What are you thankful for?

Praying for a cure for mom: Why I Walk

By: Michele Devlin  In 2016 at the age of 64, my mom, Debi Turner, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. For years, she’d had some unusual symptoms that I chalked up to stress or being tired. Boy, was I wrong. The most independent, strong woman I knew was starting to fade away. She was so young, and it progressed so fast. I had two moms: the one … Continue reading Praying for a cure for mom: Why I Walk

For Lynne and Grammy Helen: Why I Walk

Lynne Russell was 51 and raising her three sons, one 14-year-old and two 19-year-olds, when she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Her grandma, Helen, passed away from that disease the same year.  Lynne has since retired from her teaching career and lives close to her sons in Seattle in an assisted living community.  Lynne and her parents, Jim and Karen, are captains for the Lynne & … Continue reading For Lynne and Grammy Helen: Why I Walk

My best friend and grandma: Why I Walk

By: Kaitlyn Johnson Growing up, I was always “Grandma’s Girl.” I spent countless hours eating Push-Pops on the living room floor of her apartment, watching Disney movies on VHS with the boxy old TV she refused to replace and baking with her before I could even reach the kitchen counter. I am infamous among my immediate family for constantly having my nose in a book, … Continue reading My best friend and grandma: Why I Walk

Growing up when dad has dementia: Why I Walk

By: Grace Lilje It was in the Spring of 2010 when my dad, my older brother Nolan, and I piled into our car for a road trip that would forever change our lives.  My dad, Bill, who worked as a wheat farmer, had been exhibiting some uncharacteristic behaviors and patterns that my mom had recently noticed. He was having difficulty planning in his job and … Continue reading Growing up when dad has dementia: Why I Walk

Remembering Joy: Why I Walk

Joy Lofquist was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 1997 and passed away from the disease in 2015. What defined Joy, though, was not the disease but the woman she was. “I have stated many times that my mom was a force of nature. All 4’11 ½” of her,” said her son, Brian Lofquist.  For the past six years, Brian and his family have been participating in … Continue reading Remembering Joy: Why I Walk